Features of an Enterprise SSD

When looking for a flash device to use for PernixData FVP or other enterprise use cases, performance and reliability are important aspects to factor in. Just because a drive is spec’d with high IOPs and low latency numbers, doesn’t mean that it will keep up at that rate over time with enterprise workloads.

I would guess that most of you would prefer a consistent performing, reliable flash to higher IOPs or lower latency.  This is one reason why I like the Intel S3700 SSD. This drive does a good job at repeatable results and withstands heavy workloads over time. I’m not saying this drive or others are slow, these drives are still very fast, but they do favor consistency and reliability by design.

  

A little over a year ago Intel introduced a technology that enhanced the reliability of MLC flash. Intel called it HET – High Endurance Technology. This is basically an enhancement in firmware, controller and high-cycling NAND for endurance and performance. The optimization was in error avoidance techniques and write amplification reduction algorithms. The result is new enterprise SSD’s that are inexpensive and deliver good performance at predictable behavior. Keep in mind though that not all Intel drives have HET, this is what separates consumer from enterprise class drives.

This is one reason why Intel can claim “10 full drive writes per day over the 5-year life of the drive”. You will also notice that other manufactures/vendors OEM and incorporate Intel’s 25nm MLC HET NAND into their products. The incorporation of HET set’s Intel apart from the rest, but this doesn’t mean however that there are not others to choose from. It’s when you factor price, reliability, performance, and customer satisfaction that currently leads many to the S3700. 

The other important aspect to consider when looking for an enterprise SSD is read/write performance consistency. Some drives are architected just for read performance consistency. So if you have workloads that are balanced between read/write, or are write heavy then you want to look at a drive that provides consistency for both read and write.

As an example, the Intel S3500 gives better read performance consistency while the Intel S3700 gives consistency for both read and write. (Keep in mind that the Intel S3500 doesn't use HET)

 

Intel S3500 

 

Intel S3700

 

I reccomend taking a look at Frank Denneman's current blog Series that goes into some other aspects of flash performance with FVP.